Religion & Spirituality Bible Books

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version (without Cross-References)

The English Standard Version (ESV) Bible is an essentially literal Bible translation that combines word-for-word precision and accuracy with literary excellence, beauty, and depth of meaning. The ESV Bible is equipped with an enhanced navigation feature. Kindle's index feature can be used to navigate directly to any verse. This feature is not supported on the Kindle 1 or any Kindle applications.This edition of the ESV does not include cross-references.

The Ten Commandments: Life Application of the Ten Commandments With Additional Chapters on Sin, Salvation, Prayer, and More

Whoever then annuls one of the least of these commandments, and teaches others to do the same, shall be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but whoever keeps and teaches them, he shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven – Matthew 5:19Every one of the Ten Commandments is relevant today. Some think of these commandments as the Law of Moses, now replaced by God's grace and mercy, but a closer look reveals that we can't willfully break a single one of the commandments and live. Every one of the commandments wholeheartedly obeyed will produce fruit of righteousness, peace, and spiritual prosperity. Society says "do whatever you want" but a careful study and application of this set of "life principles" will provide boundless fruit for the righteous.Originally written in the 1600's, Thomas Watson's commentary on the Ten Commandments is as relevant today as it was then, if not more so. The text was carefully updated for modern readers, with much care taken to convey the truth in Watson's writings in such a way that readers today can more easily understand his writing, and as such, more easily apply the truth to their own lives. May the LORD God of heaven and earth bless you richly as you read and obey!About the AuthorThomas Watson (c. 1620-1686) was an English Nonconformist Puritan pastor and author. He earned his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees from Emmanuel College, Cambridge. In 1646 Watson was employed at St. Stephen Walbrook Church in London, where he remained for the next sixteen years.Thomas married Abigail Beadle in about 1647, and they had at least seven children, although four of the children died when young. During the English Civil War (1642-1649), Watson leaned toward Presbyterian views, and he sided with the Presbyterians in opposition to the death of King Charles I. Watson was imprisoned in 1651 for his part in a plot to bring back Charles II.In 1652 Watson was released from prison and returned to his duties at St. Stephen Walbrook Church. After the Act of Uniformity was passed in 1662, Watson, a Nonconformist, could no longer preach there, although he continued preaching in private when he was able. After the Declaration of Indulgence was passed in 1672, Thomas Watson was able to obtain a license to preach at Crosby Hall in London. He continued preaching there until his health began to decline. He then retired to Barnston in Essex, where he died in 1686 while praying.

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Matthew [Updated Edition]: A Commentary

Therefore everyone who hears these words of Mine and acts on them, may be compared to a wise man who built his house on the rock. – Matthew 7:24Wisdom, encouragement, and exhortation is contained in these pages. Not because of the author's brilliance, but because of the words of truth contained in the gospel of Matthew. And just as the apostle Matthew didn't draw any attention to himself, so also J. C. Ryle clearly and wonderfully directs his words and our thoughts towards the inspired words of scripture. If we truly love God, we will love His word; and the more study His word, the more we will love God.About the AuthorJohn Charles Ryle (1816-1900) graduated from Eton and Oxford and then pursued a career in politics, but due to lack of funds, he entered the clergy of the Church of England. He was a contemporary of Spurgeon, Moody, Mueller, and Taylor and read the great theologians like Wesley, Bunyan, Knox, Calvin, and Luther. These all influenced Ryle’s understanding and theology. Ryle began his writing career with a tract following the Great Yarmouth suspension bridge tragedy, where more than a hundred people drowned. He gained a reputation for straightforward preaching and evangelism. He travelled, preached, and wrote more than 300 pamphlets, tracts, and books, including Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, Principles for Churchmen, and Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century. Ryle used the royalties from his writing to pay his father’s debts, but he also felt indebted to that ruin for changing the direction of his life. He was recommended by Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli to be Bishop of Liverpool where he ended his career in 1900.

Are These the Last Days? (Crucial Questions)

Wars, rumors of wars, famines, earthquakes, international upheaval—Jesus said all of these things would be signs of His return. It sounds like Jesus was describing our own time, but was He really predicting the events that we see in the news every day?In this booklet, Dr. R.C. Sproul looks at Jesus’ prophecies to consider a controversial question: Are we living in the last days? The answer may surprise you.The Crucial Questions booklet series by Dr. R.C. Sproul offers succinct answers to important questions often asked by Christians and thoughtful inquirers.

Old Testament Study Guide (Old and New Testament Study Guides Book 1)

Designed for the student of God's Word, Pastor Chuck has written a verse-by-verse overview of the Old Testament. As you place this book next to your Bible, you'll discover key words that define Hebrew and Greek words commonly used, biblical maps, charts, diagrams and Calvary Chapel distinctives to help you visualize the text. Also included are introductions and study questions for each book of the Old Testament.

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Mark: A Commentary [Updated]

“Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey Him?” – Mark 4:41Wisdom, encouragement, and exhortation is contained in these pages. Not because of the author's brilliance, but because of the words of truth contained in the gospel of Mark. And just as the apostle Mark didn't draw any attention to himself, so also J. C. Ryle clearly and wonderfully directs his words and our thoughts towards the inspired words of scripture. If we truly love God, we will love His word; and the more study His word, the more we will love God. About the AuthorJohn Charles Ryle (1816-1900) graduated from Eton and Oxford and then pursued a career in politics, but due to lack of funds, he entered the clergy of the Church of England. He was a contemporary of Spurgeon, Moody, Mueller, and Taylor and read the great theologians like Wesley, Bunyan, Knox, Calvin, and Luther. These all influenced Ryle’s understanding and theology. Ryle began his writing career with a tract following the Great Yarmouth suspension bridge tragedy, where more than a hundred people drowned. He gained a reputation for straightforward preaching and evangelism. He travelled, preached, and wrote more than 300 pamphlets, tracts, and books, including Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, Principles for Churchmen, and Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century. Ryle used the royalties from his writing to pay his father’s debts, but he also felt indebted to that ruin for changing the direction of his life. He was recommended by Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli to be Bishop of Liverpool where he ended his career in 1900.

Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke: A Commentary (Updated Edition)

It seemed fitting for me as well, having investigated everything carefully from the beginning, to write it out for you in consecutive order, most excellent Theophilus; so that you may know the exact truth about the things you have been taught. - Luke 1:3-4Wisdom, encouragement, and exhortation is contained in these pages. Not because of the author's brilliance, but because of the words of truth contained in the gospel of Luke. And just as the Apostle Luke didn't draw any attention to himself, so also J. C. Ryle clearly and wonderfully directs his words and our thoughts towards the inspired words of scripture. If we truly love God, we will love His word; and the more study His word, the more we will love God.About the AuthorJohn Charles Ryle (1816-1900) graduated from Eton and Oxford and then pursued a career in politics, but due to lack of funds, he entered the clergy of the Church of England. He was a contemporary of Spurgeon, Moody, Mueller, and Taylor and read the great theologians like Wesley, Bunyan, Knox, Calvin, and Luther. These all influenced Ryle’s understanding and theology. Ryle began his writing career with a tract following the Great Yarmouth suspension bridge tragedy, where more than a hundred people drowned. He gained a reputation for straightforward preaching and evangelism. He travelled, preached, and wrote more than 300 pamphlets, tracts, and books, including Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, Principles for Churchmen, and Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century. Ryle used the royalties from his writing to pay his father’s debts, but he also felt indebted to that ruin for changing the direction of his life. He was recommended by Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli to be Bishop of Liverpool where he ended his career in 1900.

The Golden Alphabet (Updated, Annotated): An Exposition of Psalm 119

Blessed are those who walk in the perfect way, who walk in the law of the LORD. – Psalm 119:1The singular blending of testimony, prayer, and praise in Psalm 119 is admirable. In one verse, the psalmist bears witness; in a second verse, he praises; in a third verse, he prays. It is an incense made up of many spices, but they are wonderfully mixed and worked together to form one perfect sweetness. The blending greatly increases the value of the whole. You would not like to have the first third of the psalm composed of prayer, then second third made up exclusively of praise, and the third portion entirely made of testimony. It is best to have all these divinely sweet ingredients intermixed and worked together into a sacred unity, as you have them in this thrice-hallowed psalm. Its prayers bear witness, and its testimonies are fragrant with praise. This wonderful psalm, from its great length, helps us to marvel at the immensity of Scripture. As it keeps to the same subject, it helps us adore the unity of Scripture. Yet, from the many turns it brings to that one subject, it helps us see the variety of Scripture. How manifold are the words and thoughts of God! In His Word, just as in creation, the wonders of His skill are displayed in many ways. About the AuthorCharles Haddon (C. H.) Spurgeon (1834-1892) was a British Baptist preacher. He started preaching at age 17 and quickly became famous. He is still known as the “Prince of Preachers” and frequently had more than 10,000 people present to hear him preach at the Metropolitan Tabernacle in London. His sermons were printed in newspapers, translated into many languages, and published in many books.

Genesis Commentary

An In-Depth commentary by Pastor Chuck Smith looking into the Book of Genesis.