Poetry, Drama & Criticism Books

Ethics

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The Canterbury Tales

In The Canterbury Tales Chaucer created one of the great touchstones of English literature, a masterly collection of chivalric romances, moral allegories and low farce. A story-telling competition between a group of pilgrims from all walks of life is the occasion for a series of tales that range from the Knight's account of courtly love and the ebullient Wife of Bath's Arthurian legend, to the ribald anecdotes of the Miller and the Cook.

The Iliad

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The importance of interpersonal skills

This 3-hour free course demonstrated the importance of interpersonal skills in the successful management of people and workplace tasks in general.

English Fairy Tales

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

Othello

In Othello, Shakespeare creates powerful drama from a marriage between the exotic Moor Othello and the Venetian lady Desdemona that begins with elopement and mutual devotion and ends with jealous rage and death. Shakespeare builds many differences into his hero and heroine, including race, age, and cultural background. Yet most readers and audiences believe the couple’s strong love would overcome these differences were it not for Iago, who sets out to destroy Othello. Iago’s false insinuations about Desdemona’s infidelity draw Othello into his schemes, and Desdemona is subjected to Othello’s horrifying verbal and physical assaults.

Poems from a runaway: A true story

Welcome to the runaway story of Ben Westwood - a novel in poetry - ‘Poems from a runaway’.It’s his story of being a frequent runaway missing from his foster carers and childrens homes back in his west midlands (UK) homelands. Follow him on a runaway journey from ten years old, wandering from town to town before eventually at the age of twelve, finding himself in the east end of London among drug addicts and prostitutes. Soon later to be sleeping rough in London’s West end, meeting allsorts of people. It’s a story with many tragedies, but also comedic moments. Choices that would have only been made with a youngsters thinking, and angels along the way. Predators, friends, heart-warming times and dangerous moments. Hustles, wind-ups and the way young people entertain themselves along the way. Some moments in life that some may never had knew existed.A collection of sixty poems of various lengths in story timeline form, this book will guide the reader through the reality of his true-story childhood journey.Not only a great read and an eye-opener for general book and poetry lovers, but also a must-have resource for foster parents, social workers, mental health support services, homeless services, child advocates, care leavers and anyone that works with young people.Review snippets."Written skilfully as poetic prose, Ben relives his time as a runaway child on the streets but he doesn’t want people to feel sorry for him. If there is one main message, it is the power we all have to make a difference to lives, ‘to never give up on ourselves or others" "A powerful testimony and one that should be read by everybody working with young runaways." Maggie F" I guarantee you will laugh at some of Ben's antics, be consistently amazed at the strength of his survival instinct (especially during the more sinister episodes he relates) and you might even have your heart broken when you read some of Ben's more poignant and personal observations! This book certainly acts as a reminder that more empathy, compassion, love and humanity are necessary to make the world a better place for us all." Rainbow 1"The book documents Ben's true life-story from his very earliest memories to the age of 16, when he finally achieves his much sought after freedom from the well-meaning interventions of Children's Social Services. Along the way, Ben describes some gripping moments such as when, at the age of 9, he is first compelled to run away from home and when, age 12, he is locked in the house of a stranger and held at knife-point." "A truly fascinating read that I couldn't put down." Emma"This is a story of a runaway boy – an example of runaways and homeless people – expressed through the personal experiences of Ben Westwood. The threats, exposure to drug addiction, prostitution, are all encounters Ben has witnessed and are revealed from a destructive and humorous perspective. I can’t imagine a life like this and it is heart-breaking and distressing that many young people live like this in our society." " Like a lot of poetry collections, I find it more rewarding to read the poems in small bursts and consider each poem for its own spirit" Peter - The reading desk."It is a must read for anyone who works with youth that are in foster care, group homes and homeless. This holds true not only in Britain but here in the United States. Ben is a gifted writer." Susan Hickey"A great book honest and heartfelt a genuinely insightful, inspiring and readable book I couldn’t put down." Hirst"An amazing story! highly recommended. It almost felt like the life of a modern day Oliver Twist.I could seriously imagine a film being made of this!Warning: Very difficult to put down once you start reading!!" Neil Paterson (Cover illustrator)

The Schoolmistress, and other stories

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

Lorna Doone; a Romance of Exmoor

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The Story of the Treasure Seekers

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

A Short History of Scotland

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The Idea of the Labyrinth from Classical Antiquity through the Middle Ages

Ancient and medieval labyrinths embody paradox, according to Penelope Reed Doob. Their structure allows a double perspective—the baffling, fragmented prospect confronting the maze-treader within, and the comprehensive vision available to those without. Mazes simultaneously assert order and chaos, artistry and confusion, articulated clarity and bewildering complexity, perfected pattern and hesitant process. In this handsomely illustrated book, Doob reconstructs from a variety of literary and visual sources the idea of the labyrinth from the classical period through the Middle Ages.Doob first examines several complementary traditions of the maze topos, showing how ancient historical and geographical writings generate metaphors in which the labyrinth signifies admirable complexity, while poetic texts tend to suggest that the labyrinth is a sign of moral duplicity. She then describes two common models of the labyrinth and explores their formal implications: the unicursal model, with no false turnings, found almost universally in the visual arts; and the multicursal model, with blind alleys and dead ends, characteristic of literary texts. This paradigmatic clash between the labyrinths of art and of literature becomes a key to the metaphorical potential of the maze, as Doob's examination of a vast array of materials from the classical period through the Middle Ages suggests. She concludes with linked readings of four "labyrinths of words": Virgil's Aeneid, Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy, Dante's Divine Comedy, and Chaucer's House of Fame, each of which plays with and transforms received ideas of the labyrinth as well as reflecting and responding to aspects of the texts that influenced it.Doob not only provides fresh theoretical and historical perspectives on the labyrinth tradition, but also portrays a complex medieval aesthetic that helps us to approach structurally elaborate early works. Readers in such fields as Classical literature, Medieval Studies, Renaissance Studies, comparative literature, literary theory, art history, and intellectual history will welcome this wide-ranging and illuminating book.

Interpreting Greek Tragedy: Myth, Poetry, Text

This generous selection of published essays by the distinguished classicist Charles Segal represents over twenty years of critical inquiry into the questions of what Greek tragedy is and what it means for modern-day readers. Taken together, the essays reflect profound changes in the study of Greek tragedy in the United States during this period-in particular, the increasing emphasis on myth, psychoanalytic interpretation, structuralism, and semiotics.

The Card, a Story of Adventure in the Five Towns

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The World of Wolf Hall: A Reading Guide to Hilary Mantela??s Wolf Hall & Bring Up the Bodies

‘Your whole life depends on the next beat of Henry’s heart’Ahead of the release of The Mirror & the Light, the stunning conclusion to Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall Trilogy, revisit two of the most celebrated novels of our time.Bringing the opulent, brutal Tudor world of Thomas Cromwell and Henry VIII to glittering life, Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies have thrilled and delighted readers, critics and prize judges alike. Both novels won the Man Booker Prize and have sold over five million copies across the globe.This reading guide takes you through the story so far, introduces you to the main players, explores the key themes and offers reading group questions to discuss.The stage is set for The Mirror & the Light. After Henry’s marriage to his third queen, Cromwell attains riches, status and unprecedented power. But how long can his luck last – a blacksmith’s son who has risen to be an earl?

The House on the Borderland

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

Reconfiguring Human, Nonhuman and Posthuman in Literature and Culture (Perspectives on the Non-Human in Literature and Culture)

  The time has come for human cultures to seriously think, to severely conceptualize, and to earnestly fabulate about all the nonhuman critters we share our world with, and to consider how to strive for more ethical cohabitation. Reconfiguring Human, Nonhuman and Posthuman in Literature and Culture tackles this severe matter within the framework of literary and cultural studies. The emphasis of the inquiry is on the various ways actual and fictional nonhumans are reconfigured in contemporary culture – although, as long as the domain of nonhumanity is carved in the negative space of humanity, addressing these issues will inevitably clamor for the reconfiguration of the human as well.

100 Books You Must Read Before You Die [volume 2]

This 2nd volume of contains the following 50 works, arranged alphabetically by authors’ last names:Jerome, Jerome K.: Three Men in a BoatJoyce, James: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young ManJoyce, James: UlyssesKingsley, Charles: The Water-BabiesKipling, Rudyard: KimLa Fayette, Madame de: The Princess of ClèvesLaclos, Pierre Choderlos de: Dangerous LiaisonsLawrence, D. H.: Sons and LoversLawrence, D. H.: The RainbowLe Fanu, Sheridan: In a Glass DarklyLewis, Matthew Gregory: The MonkLewis, Sinclair: Main StreetLondon, Jack: The Call of the WildLovecraft, H.P.: At the Mountains of MadnessMann, Thomas: Royal HighnessMaugham, William Somerset: Of Human BondageMaupassant, Guy de: Bel-AmiMelville, Herman: Moby-DickPoe, Edgar Allan: The Fall of the House of UsherProust, Marcel: Swann's WayRadcliffe, Ann: The Mysteries of UdolphoRichardson, Samuel: ClarissaSand, George: The Devil’s PoolScott, Walter: IvanhoeShelley, Mary: FrankensteinSienkiewicz, Henryk: Quo VadisSinclair, May: Life and Death of Harriett FreanSinclair, Upton: The JungleStendhal: The Red and the BlackStendhal: The Chartreuse of ParmaSterne, Laurence: Tristram ShandyStevenson, Robert Louis: Treasure IslandStoker, Bram: DraculaStowe, Harriet Beecher: Uncle Tom’s CabinSwift, Jonathan: Gulliver's TravelsTagore, Rabindranath: The Home and the WorldThackeray, William Makepeace: Vanity FairTolstoy, Leo: War and PeaceTolstoy, Leo: Anna KareninaTrollope, Anthony: The Way We Live NowTurgenev, Ivan: Fathers and SonsTwain, Mark: The Adventures of Huckleberry FinnVerne, Jules: Journey to the Center of the EarthWallace, Lew: Ben-HurWells, H. G.: The Time MachineWest, Rebecca: The Return of the SoldierWharton, Edith: The Age of InnocenceWilde, Oscar: The Picture of Dorian GrayXueqin, Cao: The Dream of the Red ChamberZola, Émile: Germinal

Postcolonialism Cross-Examined: Multidirectional Perspectives on Imperial and Colonial Pasts and the Neocolonial Present (Routledge Philosophers in Focus Series)

Taking a strikingly interdisciplinary and global approach, Postcolonialism Cross-Examined reflects on the current status of postcolonial studies and attempts to break through traditional boundaries, creating a truly comparative and genuinely global phenomenon. Drawing together the field of mainstream postcolonial studies with post-Soviet postcolonial studies and studies of the late Ottoman Empire, the contributors in this volume question many of the concepts and assumptions we have become accustomed to in postcolonial studies, creating a fresh new version of the field. The volume calls the merits of the field into question, investigating how postcolonial studies may have perpetuated and normalized colonialism as an issue exclusive to Western colonial and imperial powers. The volume is the first to open a dialogue between three different areas of postcolonial scholarship that previously developed independently from one another:• the wide field of postcolonial studies working on European colonialism,• the growing field of post-Soviet postcolonial/post-imperial studies,• the still fledgling field of post-Ottoman postcolonial/post-imperial studies, supported by sideways glances at the multidirectional conditions of interaction in East Africa and the East and West Indies.Postcolonialism Cross-Examined looks at topics such as humanism, nationalism, multiculturalism, nostalgia, and the Anthropocene in order to piece together a new, broader vision for postcolonial studies in the twenty-first century. By including territories other than those covered by the postcolonial mainstream, the book strives to reframe the “postcolonial” as a genuinely global phenomenon and develop multidirectional postcolonial perspectives.

pizza. patience. and all things love.: a collection of crowd-sourced love definitions and the art it inspired

What is love? This crowd-sourced exercise produced 500+ responses from ages 6 – 83. Is pizza love to you? Or maybe dogs? There’s no wrong answer if it’s coming from the heart. Seeking out the stories of those in her community, and bringing a visual voice to their emotions, Coligan hopes to facilitate conversations around the importance of diversity, tolerance and mutual respect.Michigan-raised Coligan currently lives in Chicago with her three sons where her work is on permanent display at Agave Studio. She spends her days strategizing as a Design Director in the Loop, and in her spare time (ha!) she composes and performs original music, and creates art inspired by those around her. Her latest focus is in Policy through The University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy—where she intends to continue her organizing and advocacy projects in order to optimize her opportunity to make a real difference in people’s lives.

"The War as it Should Have Been": Metaphor and Mental Spaces in David Jones' In Parenthesis

In this comprehensive essay, I re-frame David Jones' modern First World War epic poem In Parenthesis while deploying theories of conceptual metaphor, mental spaces, and perception of time, much as Jones re-framed the War within his distinct style of form and narrative. Rich with illustrated figures, my argument is not only built from the careful consideration of ideas put forth by literary critics like T.S. Eliot, but it is also grounded with work by renowned cognitive scientists like George Lakoff and (monk riddle teller) Gilles Fauconnier. The ability to analyze literature systematically and in bio-psychological context is a true innovation, much like David Jones’ exquisite poem itself. The field of cognitive poetics encourages us to experiment in literary criticism. Psychology has unearthed so much about consciousness and unconsciousness in recent decades that we can effectively go backward in time to use that new knowledge as a lens to observe what unconscious and conscious motivations may lay within an author’s mind as he pens a work. Enjoy.

Browning as a Philosophical and Religious Teacher

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

Ulysses

In the past, Ulysses has been labeled dirty, blasphemous, and even unreadable. None of these adjectives, however, do the slightest justice to the novel. To this day it remains the modernist masterpiece, in which the author takes both Celtic lyricism and vulgarity to splendid extremes. It is funny, sorrowful, and even (in a close-focus sort of way) suspenseful. And despite the exegetical industry that has sprung up in the last 75 years, Ulysses is also a compulsively readable book.William Blake saw the universe in a grain of sand. Joyce saw it in Dublin, Ireland, on June 16, 1904, a day distinguished by its utter normality. Two characters, Stephen Dedalus and Leopold Bloom, go about their separate business, crossing paths with a gallery of indelible Dubliners. We watch them teach, eat, stroll the streets, argue, and (in Bloom’s case) masturbate. And thanks to the book’s stream-of-consciousness technique — which suggests no mere stream but an impossibly deep, swift-running river — we’re privy to their thoughts, emotions, and memories. The result? Almost every variety of human experience is crammed into the accordian folds of a single day, which makes Ulysses not just an experimental work but the very last word in realism.I hold this book to be the most important expression which the present age has found; it is a book to which we are all indebted, and from which none of us can escape. —T. S. EliotWhat is so staggering about “Ulysses” is the fact that behind a thousand veils nothing lies hidden; that it turns neither toward the mind nor toward the world, but, as cold as the moon looking on from cosmic space, allows the drama of growth, being, and decay to pursue its course. —Carl JungThe greatest novel of the 20th century. —Anthony Burgess“Ulysses” is extraordinarily interesting to those who have patience (and they need it). —John Middleton MurryIt is difficult not to acclaim a masterpiece. —Virginia Woolf

Day of the Flying Leaves: Selected Poems

"Like everyone, I go around imagining things, trying to identify what I see and hear and conserving memories. My poems are thoughts portrayed in words, in the belief that sometimes a word is worth a thousand pictures." (Stephen Moran)