Humour Essays Books

Taking Off

A few years after graduating college, Ty was fed up with "working" and "acting responsibly like every other adult is expected to," and chose instead to quit his job and backpack across Europe and Asia. Taking Off is the mostly true memoir of his trip.

Yes, this may come as a shock, but a twenty-something wrote about his experiences travelling. Kind of like when Ashley from HR sent you the link to her vacation blog. The differences being that this book is longer, has less pictures of Ashley in a bikini, and gives you no real obligation to read it since you'll never bump into Ty in the break room where he'll ask you how you liked it. But regardless of obligation, you can still appreciate this book, as it consists of several humorous, interesting, and worthwhile anecdotes that are way more interesting than anything that self-absorbed narcissist Ashley could ever write.

This book is completely, 100% free. So if you're interested, give it a read. If you like it, tell a friend about how good it was. If you don't like it, lie to an enemy about how good it was. Either way, make sure to flaunt the book's completion to someone. You're literate for God's sake, and the contemptible people with whom you surround yourself need to be made aware of your superiority.

Life Lessons, By Year

The saying "You're only young once" isn't really applicable to our generation. The time capsule that is Thought Catalog lets readers live it and relive it again. Many of our writers have gotten into a habit of composing year-in-review lists on the eve of their birthdays. Here, we've combined essays from writers 18-31 years of age. While desires and reactions might change from year to year, you'll notice that at every age, we all want the same thing: to waste less time worrying and more time doing.

Benjamin Byrde, Traveller Extraordinaire: Round One - Berkshire to Istanbul

In BENJAMIN BYRDE, Traveller Extraordinaire we follow the fate of a peculiar man who decides to relinquish his property, money and clothes, before setting off around the world, relying solely on the kindness and generosity of strangers. While several of his benefactors are indeed very strange, none are more eccentric than Mr Byrde himself, whose tales stretch even the most malleable imagination.

This first volume of unique travel memoirs transports us from leafy Berkshire to sultry Istanbul and gives us a blow-by-blow account of his varying fortunes along the way. Ever the optimist, Benjamin tackles every obstacle with his customary zeal, and the fifty-seven-year-old displays great powers of self-preservation, despite never having worked due to his singular way of seeing the world.

England, France, Germany, Austria, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, and a bit of Turkey are the countries he visits, and Benjamin's 'Byrde's-eye view' of Europe is like no other ever published in our time.

Listed under: Humour - Parodies

Please 'look inside' before purchasing.

Spanish Journals: The Posthumous Diary of an Expat: Part Two: Invasion

- 'This diary, written by my late husband Ernest Postlethwaite, has been published expressly against his wishes, but with the full and hearty endorsement of my family and friends.' - From the introduction to Part One by Pamela Postlethwaite, Javea, Spain, December 2012 This second instalment of Ernest Postlethwaite's ground-breaking journal charters the continuing progress of a man on a mission to achieve cultural and linguistic integration in a small village in southern Spain. As summer approaches, our hero finds himself confronted by undesirable interruptions to the smooth running of his new life, in the shape of summer visitors. How will a man so tethered to the soil and immersed in the life of his new country cope with this alien invasion? This unadulterated manuscript will bring tears to the eyes of the most hard-hearted amongst us, as we follow his footsteps even further into the great unknown. (This is a fictional diary.) By the same author: 'Barry Braithwaite's Last Life', 'The Year that Crime Paid', and 'Thirty Brief Tales from England and Spain'

The Future and Why We Should Avoid It: Killer Robots, the Apocalypse and Other Topics of Mild Concern

The future holds many unknowns: advances in medical technology, increased airport security and critical new inventions like sentient, polygraph-enabled, wireless toasters. Luckily, Maclean's columnist Scott Feschuk has written a survival guide -- part how-to manual, part product guide, part apocalypse analysis and part sardonic observation -- to help us navigate these troubled times. Or at least make us laugh while we try. The Future and Why We Should Avoid It envisions the daunting, depressing era we have to look forward to with the best of Feschuk's musings on aging, death, technology, inventions, health and leisure. Combining quizzes, voiceovers and speeches, and employing snark, innuendo, toilet humor and shameless mockery -- because how else do you cope with the fact that one day you will die? -- Feschuk contemplates the fate of humanity and the planet in the upcoming years, poking fun, provoking thought and dredging up silver linings in even the darkest forecasts.

I'm Not Talking about You, of Course: Quirky Essays for Quirky People, Book 1

Winner of the "Indie Book of the Day" award for June 7, 2014.



This work is a collection of humorous insights into important topics ranging from annoying pet people ("I'm Not Talking About You, of Course"), to analyzing your inner child ("Irrational Fears"), to living like the Amish in the aftermath of a hurricane ("A Jolt of Electricity"). Other essays examine just how much damage can be caused by a sneeze ("It All Started with a Loud Sneeze"), why it is so complicated to buy a tube of toothpaste ("Ask Me No Questions"), how not to prepare dinner ("Martha, I Let You Down"), making new friends ("Friends in Low Places"), how a parent's obsessive hobbies can become an inescapable vortex ("Crazy Hobbies"), and why spending the night in a sleep clinic is like being abducted by probing aliens ("Nightmare at the Sleep Clinic"). If you don't see yourself in each of these entertaining essays, then I'm not talking about you, of course.