Computing & Internet UNIX & Linux Books

Linux Kernel Programming Part 2 - Char Device Drivers and Kernel Synchronization: Create user-kernel interfaces, work with peripheral I/O, and handle hardware interrupts

Discover how to write high-quality character driver code, interface with userspace, work with chip memory, and gain an in-depth understanding of working with hardware interrupts and kernel synchronizationKey FeaturesDelve into hardware interrupt handling, threaded IRQs, tasklets, softirqs, and understand which to use whenExplore powerful techniques to perform user-kernel interfacing, peripheral I/O and use kernel mechanismsWork with key kernel synchronization primitives to solve kernel concurrency issuesBook DescriptionLinux Kernel Programming Part 2 - Char Device Drivers and Kernel Synchronization is an ideal companion guide to the Linux Kernel Programming book. This book provides a comprehensive introduction for those new to Linux device driver development and will have you up and running with writing misc class character device driver code (on the 5.4 LTS Linux kernel) in next to no time. You'll begin by learning how to write a simple and complete misc class character driver before interfacing your driver with user-mode processes via procfs, sysfs, debugfs, netlink sockets, and ioctl. You'll then find out how to work with hardware I/O memory. The book covers working with hardware interrupts in depth and helps you understand interrupt request (IRQ) allocation, threaded IRQ handlers, tasklets, and softirqs. You'll also explore the practical usage of useful kernel mechanisms, setting up delays, timers, kernel threads, and workqueues. Finally, you'll discover how to deal with the complexity of kernel synchronization with locking technologies (mutexes, spinlocks, and atomic/refcount operators), including more advanced topics such as cache effects, a primer on lock-free techniques, deadlock avoidance (with lockdep), and kernel lock debugging techniques. By the end of this Linux kernel book, you'll have learned the fundamentals of writing Linux character device driver code for real-world projects and products.What you will learnGet to grips with the basics of the modern Linux Device Model (LDM)Write a simple yet complete misc class character device driverPerform user-kernel interfacing using popular methodsUnderstand and handle hardware interrupts confidentlyPerform I/O on peripheral hardware chip memoryExplore kernel APIs to work with delays, timers, kthreads, and workqueuesUnderstand kernel concurrency issuesWork with key kernel synchronization primitives and discover how to detect and avoid deadlockWho this book is forAn understanding of the topics covered in the Linux Kernel Programming book is highly recommended to make the most of this book. This book is for Linux programmers beginning to find their way with device driver development. Linux device driver developers looking to overcome frequent and common kernel/driver development issues, as well as perform common driver tasks such as user-kernel interfaces, performing peripheral I/O, handling hardware interrupts, and dealing with concurrency will benefit from this book. A basic understanding of Linux kernel internals (and common APIs), kernel module development, and C programming is required. Table of ContentsWriting a simple Misc Character Device DriverUser-Kernel Communication PathwaysWorking with hardware IO MemoryHandling Hardware InterruptsTimers, Kernel Threads and MoreKernel Synchronization, Part 1Kernel Synchronization, Part 2

Linux Bastion Hosts on the AWS Cloud: Linux Bastion Host Quick Start

This is official Amazon Web Services (AWS) documentation for the Linux bastion Quick Start. This Quick Start adds Linux bastion hosts to your new or existing AWS infrastructure for your Linux-based deployments. After you deploy this Quick Start, you can layer your cloud environment with additional AWS services, infrastructure components, and applications to complete your Linux environment in the AWS Cloud. The bastion hosts provide secure access to Linux instances located in the private and public subnets of your VPC. The Quick Start architecture deploys Linux bastion host instances into the public subnets to provide readily available administrative access to the environment. The Quick Start creates an Auto Scaling group to ensure that the number of bastion host instances always matches the capacity you specify. The Quick Start also sets up Amazon CloudWatch Logs for remote storage of shell history logs, for added security. AWS CloudFormation templates automate the deployment. The deployment guide is offered here as a free Kindle book, or you can read it online or in PDF format; see https://aws.amazon.com/quickstart/architecture/linux-bastion/.

Linux Bastion Hosts on AWS (AWS Quick Start)

This Quick Start adds Linux bastion hosts to your new or existing AWS infrastructure for your Linux-based deployments. After you deploy this Quick Start, you can layer your cloud environment with additional AWS services, infrastructure components, and applications to complete your Linux environment in the AWS Cloud.The bastion hosts provide secure access to Linux instances located in the private and public subnets of your VPC. The Quick Start architecture deploys Linux bastion host instances into every public subnet to provide readily available administrative access to the environment. The Quick Start sets up a Multi-AZ environment consisting of two Availability Zones. If highly available bastion access is not necessary, you can stop the instance in the second Availability Zone and start it up when needed. This documentation is offered for free here as a Kindle book, or you can read it online or in PDF format at https://aws.amazon.com/quickstart/.

The Complete Linux Manual Magazine: Expert Tutorials To Improve Your Skills

This book by Richard Blum serves as a basic and very essential Linux resource that will guide you with plenty of examples. Linux Command Line and Shell Scripting Bible go right away into the fundamentals of the command line, introduces you to bash scripting which will be very important in your day-to-day Linux administration, and goes an extra mile by providing detailed examples. The third edition is the latest release, it has new updated content and examples aligned with the latest Linux features.