Science & Nature History & Philosophy Books

Stress in Post-War Britain (Studies for the Society for the Social History of Medicine)

In the years following World War II the health and well-being of the nation was of primary concern to the British government. The essays in this collection examine the relationship between health and stress in post-war Britain through a series of carefully connected case studies.

Social Theory of Fear: Terror, Torture, and Death in a Post-Capitalist World

Elites rely on fear to keep and expand their privileges and control the masses. In the current crisis of the capitalist world system, elites in the United States, along with other central countries, promote fear of crime and terrorism. This book offers an analysis of the crisis and strategies for rebellion.

Digital Vertigo: How Today's Online Social Revolution Is Dividing, Diminishing, and Disorienting Us

[ [ Digital Vertigo: How Today's Online Social Revolution Is Dividing, Diminishing, and Disorienting Us ] ] By Keen, Andrew ( Author ) May - 2012 [ Hardcover ]

Making Medicines in Africa: The Political Economy of Industrializing for Local Health (International Political Economy Series)

This book is open access under a CC-BY license. The importance of the pharmaceutical industry in Sub-Saharan Africa, its claim to policy priority, is rooted in the vast unmet health needs of the sub-continent. Making Medicines in Africa is a collective endeavour, by a group of contributors with a strong African and more broadly Southern presence, to find ways to link technological development, investment and industrial growth in pharmaceuticals to improve access to essential good quality medicines, as part of moving towards universal access to competent health care in Africa. The authors aim to shift the emphasis in international debate and initiatives towards sustained Africa-based and African-led initiatives to tackle this huge challenge. Without the technological, industrial, intellectual, organisational and research-related capabilities associated with competent pharmaceutical production, and without policies that pull the industrial sectors towards serving local health needs, the African sub-continent cannot generate the resources to tackle its populations' needs and demands. Research for this book has been selected as one of the 20 best examples of the impact of UK research on development. See http://www.ukcds.org.uk/the-global-impact-of-uk-research for further details.

Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England: Ravenous Natures (Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine)

This book is open access under a CC-BY licence. Cancer is perhaps the modern world's most feared disease. Yet, we know relatively little about this malady's history before the nineteenth century. This book provides the first in-depth examination of perceptions of cancerous disease in early modern England. Looking to drama, poetry and polemic as well as medical texts and personal accounts, it contends that early modern people possessed an understanding of cancer which remains recognizable to us today. Many of the ways in which medical practitioners and lay people imagined cancer - as a 'woman's disease' or a 'beast' inside the body - remain strikingly familiar, and they helped to make this disease a byword for treachery and cruelty in discussions of religion, culture and politics. Equally, cancer treatments were among the era's most radical medical and surgical procedures. From buttered frog ointments to agonizing and dangerous surgeries, they raised abiding questions about the nature of disease and the proper role of the medical practitioner.

Health, disease and society: Scottish influence in the 19th century

This 10-hour free course explored the Scottish contribution to developments in healthcare during the nineteenth century.

The history of medicine: A Scottish perspective

This 10-hour free course explored the influences on Scottish healthcare institutions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Medicine transformed: On access to healthcare

This 15-hour free course explored inequalities in healthcare in the early twentieth century, in terms of both quality of care and access to services.