History Middle East Books

Writing Self, Writing Empire: Chandar Bhan Brahman And The Cultural World Of The Indo-Persian State Secretary (South Asia Across The Disciplines)

Writing Self, Writing Empire examines the life, career, and writings of the Mughal state secretary, or munshi, Chandar Bhan "Brahman" (d. c. 1670), one of the great Indo-Persian poets and prose stylists of early modern South Asia. Chandar Bhan's life spanned the reigns of four different emperors, Akbar (1556-1605), Jahangir (1605-1627), Shah Jahan (1628-1658), and Aurangzeb 'Alamgir (1658-1707), the last of the "Great Mughals" whose courts dominated the culture and politics of the subcontinent at the height of the empire's power, territorial reach, and global influence. As a high-caste Hindu who worked for a series of Muslim monarchs and other officials, forming powerful friendships along the way, Chandar Bhan's experience bears vivid testimony to the pluralistic atmosphere of the Mughal court, particularly during the reign of Shah Jahan, the celebrated builder of the Taj Mahal. But his widely circulated and emulated works also touch on a range of topics central to our understanding of the court's literary, mystical, administrative, and ethical cultures, while his letters and autobiographical writings provide tantalizing examples of early modern Indo-Persian modes of self-fashioning. Chandar Bhan's oeuvre is a valuable window onto a crucial, though surprisingly neglected, period of Mughal cultural and political history.

Migration in the Southern Balkans: From Ottoman Territory to Globalized Nation States (IMISCOE Research Series)

This volume collects ten essays that look at intra-regional migration in the Southern Balkans from the late Ottoman period to the present. It examines forced as well as voluntary migrations and places these movements within their historical context, including ethnic cleansing, population exchanges, and demographic engineering in the service of nation-building as well as more recent labor migration due to globalization. Inside, readers will find the work of international experts that cuts across national and disciplinary lines. This cross-cultural, comparative approach fully captures the complexity of this highly fractured, yet interconnected, region. Coverage explores the role of population exchanges in the process of nation-building and irredentist policies in interwar Bulgaria, the story of Thracian refugees and their organizations in Bulgaria, the changing waves of migration from the Balkans to Turkey, Albanian immigrants in Greece, and the diminished importance of ethnic migration after the 1990s. In addition, the collection looks at such under-researched aspects of migration as memory, gender, and religion. The field of migration studies in the Southern Balkans is still fragmented along national and disciplinary lines. Moreover, the study of forced and voluntary migrations is often separate with few interconnections. The essays collected in this book bring these different traditions together. This complete portrait will help readers gain deep insight and better understanding into the diverse migration flows and intercultural exchanges that have occurred in the Southern Balkans in the last two centuries.

Flight From Syria: Refugee Stories

Flight from Syria: Refugee Stories features the writing and photography of nine Pulitzer Center grantees- journalists who reported on Syrian refugees between 2012 and 2015. Their travels took them from Syria to Sweden, and from crowded camps to cramped apartments in city suburbs. Each of the journalists- Hugh Eakin, Lauren Gelfond Feldinger, Stephen Franklin, Joanna Kakissis, Alia Malek, Holly Pickett, Alisa Roth, Alice Su, and Selin Thomas- lends a unique perspective. Originally published in Al Jazeera, BBC News, Guernica, In These Times, Marketplace, NPR, The Atlantic and The New York Review of Books, these stories tell of an abandoned homeland, an indifferent world, and an uncertain future. They trace the history of one of the biggest displacements of modern times- providing a testament to the suffering and courage of those who fled.

Edited by Kem Knapp Sawyer

Designed by Evey Wilson

Arabian Knights - Volume 1 (Knights of Arabia)

Kindle Bestseller

*History

*Biographies & Memoirs

Overview:

If you're looking for something light to read and would like to expand your horizons then this is the book for you. It's a fun and interesting collection of brief stories about the adventures and misadventures of ordinary, famous and infamous real-life Arabian Knights (there won't be any armor or jousting - different culture!)

In this volume you can read about the following:

Story #1: Antarah bin Shaddad, a man brought up in his father's household as a slave, seizes the opportunity to try and gain his freedom.

Story #2: Hatim Al-Taaee promises to feed his neighbor's children even though he has nothing to feed his own, gives away a fortune and is humbled by the generosity of an orphaned bedouin youth.

Story #3: Owes bin Haritha is given a costly gift which causes his jealous peers to hire a poet to publicly ridicule him. When the overzealous poet insults Owes' mother, Owes swears vengeance on the man and angrily pursues him.

Story #4: Al-Numan bin Al-Munthir, the king of Al-Heira, loses his way one dark night and is taken in by a friendly bedouin couple. Later, the king finds himself in the uncomfortable position of sentencing his kind host to death.

Story #5: Abd Al-Muttalib bin Hisham, a Qurashi elder, swears to sacrifice one of his sons to god in return for being blessed with ten healthy, strong adult sons. Years later, surrounded by his ten adult sons, Abd Al-Muttalib is haunted by his oath. If he does not sacrifice one of his sons, might god take away all ten of them?

Story #6: Ghaelan bin Salamah bravely volunteers to go speak with Kisra, the king of the Persians, on whose lands he and his fellow merchants have inadvertently trespassed. Will his smooth words pave the way to great profits or an early grave?

Story #7: Abu Sufyan is interrogated by the Roman Emperor Heraclius who is trying to determine the veracity of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him).

Story #8: Hajib bin Zurarah grows weary of the terrible drought afflicting his tribe's lands so he proposes the idea of traveling to the borders of the Persian kingdom and temporarily settling there. The journey is long and arduous and, once they arrive there, they may be turned away by the formidable king of the Persians, Kisra.

Story #9: Abu Al-Qassim Al-Tanbouri keeps his old madas (leather sandals) and replaces the worn out parts rather than buying a new pair of madas. Then, through a series of unfortunate events, Al-Tanbouri's madas cause him to go to jail, repeatedly.

Story #10: A knight, a housewife and a bedouin man use their agile wits to make sure things go their way.

Included in this ebook is a map illustrating the locations of the cities and areas mentioned in the stories.

Also by Aisha Bilal:

1. Arabian Knights - Volume 2

2. Muslim Knights - Volume 1

3. Muslim Knights - Volume 2

4. Islamic and Arabian Quotes and Proverbs - Volume 1 [Illustrated]

The Doctor,The Eye Doctor and Me: Analogies and Parallels Between The World of Doctor Who and the Syrian Conflict

"Never cruel or cowardly. Never give up, never give in" - The Doctor's Promise

"Assad or we burn the country" - The Eye Doctor's Promise

The Doctor, the lead character in the BBC's phenomenally successful TV show "Doctor Who"; a time-traveling alien hundreds of years old. A compassionate person with the curiosity of a child and the wisdom of the ages.

The Eye Doctor, Bashar Assad of Syria, whose ophthalmology studies in the UK were interrupted to enable him to inherit the presidency of a country from his father.

"The Doctor, the Eye Doctor and Me" is the world of Doctor Who and the Syrian conflict as seen through the eyes of Aboud Dandachi, an activist and refugee from the city of Homs. The book attempts to explain the events of the Syrian conflict by exploring the remarkable analogies, parallels and contrasts between the war and the adventures of the Eleventh Doctor. Among the thirteen episodes the book draws on include;

The Impossible Astronaut/The Day of the Moon, the day the Doctor fought his own revolution.

The Doctor's Wife, the day the Doctor lost his home and himself became a displaced person.

A Good Man Goes to War, as opposed to how a "bad man" implements "reforms".

Journey to the Center of the TARDIS, when the Doctor proved truly capable of Machiavellian manipulations that would put dictators to shame.

Asylum of the Daleks, and the narratives individuals create and live by in order to endure the burdens of war.

The Night of the Doctor, what happens when both sides in a conflict become as bad as the other.

The Time of the Doctor, the most important factor and lesson in war, any war, as exemplified by the Doctor's hundreds year battle to protect one town from the combined forces of the universe.

The book also examines the contrasting languages used by the Doctor and the Eye Doctor, and how the year 2013 was a milestone for both Doctor Who and Syria's political history.

Written by Aboud Dandachi, a Syrian activist who over the course of the war would live in both opposition and loyalist areas, and witness first hand the effects of the conflict on both communities, "The Doctor, the Eye Doctor and Me" is a unique interpretation of Doctor Who as it marked its fiftieth anniversary, and a first-hand account of the most devastating period in Syria's modern history.

It is both the story of one person's journey through the different stages of the Syrian conflict, and the lessons and insights into the meaning of the events of that journey as gleaned from parallels and analogies with one of the century's most remarkable cultural achievements.

Notes on the Byzantine Empire (The 101 Notes Series)

Ch. 1 introduces the topic of the Byzantine Empire, summarizing some of the themes and events that took place during its reign. After doing so, Ch. 1 discusses the origins of the Byzantine Empire as the eastern half of the Roman Empire. Ch. 2 discusses the system put in place by the Romans to establish two co-emperors to rule western and eastern halves of the empire during the 4th century. Ch. 2 then discusses Constantine's conversion and establishment of Constantinople as the capital of the eastern half. Ch. 3 discusses why the western half of the empire fell while the eastern half continued. Then Ch. 3 further discusses the Byzantines' culture, most prominently its religion. Even after Rome fell in 476 A.D., the Byzantines continued to consider themselves as part of the Roman Empire. Thus it was a prerogative to attempt to reconquer the western half of the Roman Empire. Ch. 4 looks at the Byzantines' expansion under the Justinians during the 6th-7th centuries. Ch. 5 details the rise of Islam in the Middle East, which led to an Islamic caliphate's attempt to push westward across North Africa and even into Spain, bringing it into direct conflict with the Byzantine Empire. Ch. 6 looks at the constant battles the Byzantines fought during the 8th-10th centuries, as the Byzantines fought to maintain their supremacy in the region. As the Byzantine empire's territory continued to shrink at the turn of the new millennium, they hoped to utilize their shared faith with Western Europe to assist them in expelling the Turks. The result was the most famous series of religious conflicts in history. Ch. 7 profiles the Crusades. Ch. 8 discusses the eventual fall of the Byzantines at the hands of the Ottomans. But Ch. 8 also details how, before the empire was dissolved, much of the works of antiquity safely possessed in the Byzantine Empire had made their way west and helped spark the Renaissance.

Crisis in the Arab World

The events of January and February 2011 have shaken not only the Middle East and North Africa but the whole world.

Starting in Tunisia in December 2010, unrest has spiralled through the Arab world, with extraordinary results: following mass uprisings, the Tunisian dictator Zine al-Abidine Ben-Ali has fled the country, while his counterpart Hosni Mubarak of Egypt decided to stand down with immediate effect. Meanwhile, Algeria - also ruled by a military dictatorship - has seen major riots, with several protestors killed, while similar demonstrations in Yemen have led President Saleh to announce that he will not seek another term in office.

Crisis in the Arab World is a free sampler of Yale books that discuss these three febrile regions.

THE BATTLE OF JERUSALEM - a Short History of the Six-Day War: June 1967

"This is how history should be written. [Clifford] Irving makes not only the battles, but the issues and the warriors, spring to life."

-- Robert C. Goldston, International Herald Tribune

A short and spellbinding book about the Six-Day War of June 1967, in which Israel fought for its life for the third time in its brief history - and won a decisive victory against overwhelming odds. The author was there as a correspondent for NBC-TV, became a friend of Israeli soldiers and pilots, witnessed part of the battle for the Golan Heights, and traveled post-war to the Suez Canal in a command car with Irwin Shaw, Jules Dassin, and Martha Gellhorn.

Illustrated with rare and moving photographs of the battles, plus clear maps.