Fiction Classics Books

Paradise Lost (Deluxe Slipcase Gift Edition)

In this epic work, John Milton seeks "to justify the ways of God to men" through the familiar Christian myth of the fall from grace. The poem is imbued with Milton's profoundly individual view of man's place in the universe and his intellectual and spiritual quest for redemption in the face of despair. This unique clothbound edition includes its own slipcase and all fifty of the magnificent engravings produced by Gustave Dore especially for the work.

Wuthering Heights

Bold and unique, Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights is a heartbreaking tale of love, loss and vengeance.

Little Women (Puffin in Bloom)

DIFFERENT OFFER (this item listed here is DIFFERENT from the title and/or picture above. Please see description & pictures by BookGems before placing an order): Edition "The Children Golden Library" published by MDS Books/Mediasat (in association with Mediafund, Ltd.), 2003. ISBN: 8497890574. HARDBACK & Unabridged. 255 pages, size: 12.5 x 21.3 x 1.5 cm. The whole new and unread book remains in very good condition throughout. Text all clean, neat and tight. Prompt dispatch from UK.

Pilgrim's Progress: Updated, Modern English. More Than 100 Illustrations.

Often disguised as something that would help him, evil accompanies Christian on his journey to the Celestial City. As you walk with him, you ll begin to identify today s many religious pitfalls. These are presented by men such as Pliable, who turns back at the Slough of Despond; and Ignorance, who believes he s a true follower of Christ when he s really only trusting in himself. Each character represented in this allegory is intentionally and profoundly accurate in its depiction of what we see all around us, and unfortunately, what we too often see in ourselves. But while Christian is injured and nearly killed, he eventually prevails to the end. So can you. The best part of this book is the Bible verses added to the text. The original "Pilgrim s Progress" listed the Bible verse references, but the verses themselves are so impactful when tied to the scenes in this allegory, that they are now included within the text of this book. The text is tweaked just enough to make it readable today, for the young and the old. Youngsters in particular will be drawn to the original illustrations included in this wonderful classic."

Innocence: Part 1, Chapters 1 to 21

Heart-stopping supernatural thriller from the master of suspense. Addison Goodheart is not like other people...

Addison Goodheart lives in solitude beneath the city, an exile from a society which will destroy him if he is ever seen.

Books are his refuge and his escape: he embraces the riches they have to offer. By night he leaves his hidden chambers and, through a network of storm drains and service tunnels, makes his way into the central library.

And that is where he meets Gwyneth, who, like Addison, also hides her true appearance and struggles to trust anyone.

But the bond between them runs deeper than the tragedies that have scarred their lives. Something more than chance - and nothing less than destiny - has brought them together in a world whose hour of reckoning is fast approaching.

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Wisehouse Classics Edition)

STRANGE CASE OF DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE is the original title of a novella written by the Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson that was first published in 1886. It is about a London lawyer named Gabriel John Utterson who investigates strange occurrences between his old friend, Dr. Henry Jekyll, and the evil Edward Hyde.

The work is commonly associated with the rare mental condition often called "split personality", referred to in psychiatry as dissociative identity disorder, where within the same body there exists more than one distinct personality.[4] In this case, there are two personalities within Dr. Jekyll, one apparently good and the other evil. The novella's impact is such that it has become a part of the language, with the very phrase "Jekyll and Hyde" coming to mean a person who is vastly different in moral character from one situation to the next.

Dubliners (Wisehouse Classics Edition)

DUBLINERS is a collection of fifteen short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914. They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century. The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak, and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences. They centre on Joyce's idea of an epiphany: a moment where a character experiences a life-changing self-understanding or illumination. Many of the characters in Dubliners later appear in minor roles in Joyce's novel Ulysses. The initial stories in the collection are narrated by child protagonists, and as the stories continue, they deal with the lives and concerns of progressively older people. This is in line with Joyce's tripartite division of the collection into childhood, adolescence and maturity.

The Iliad

How Agamemnon and Achilles fell out at the siege of Troy; and Achilles withdrew himself from battle, and won from Zeus a pledge that his wrong should be avenged on Agamemnon and the Achaians.

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION.

POPE'S PREFACE TO THE ILIAD OF HOMER

BOOK I.-THE CONTENTION OF ACHILLES ANDAGAMEMNON.

BOOK II.-THE TRIAL OF THE ARMY, AND CATALOGUE OF THE FORCES.

BOOK III.-THE DUEL OF MENELAUS AND PARIS.

BOOK IV.-THE BREACH OF THE TRUCE, AND THE FIRST BATTLE.

BOOK V.-THE ACTS OF DIOMED.

BOOK VI.-THE EPISODES OF GLAUCUS AND DIOMED, AND OF HECTOR AND ANDROMACHE.

BOOK VII.-THE SINGLE COMBAT OF HECTOR AND AJAX.

BOOK VIII.-THE SECOND BATTLE, AND THE DISTRESS OF THE GREEKS.

BOOK IX.-THE EMBASSY TO ACHILLES.

BOOK X.-THE NIGHT-ADVENTURE OF DIOMED AND ULYSSES.

BOOK XI.-THE THIRD BATTLE, AND THE ACTS OF AGAMEMNON.

BOOK XII.-THE BATTLE AT THE GRECIAN WALL.

BOOK XIII.-THE FOURTH BATTLE CONTINUED, IN WHICH NEPTUNE ASSISTS THE GREEKS: THE ACTS OF IDOMENEUS.

BOOK XIV.-JUNO DECEIVES JUPITER BY THE GIRDLE OF VENUS.

BOOK XV.-THE FIFTH BATTLE AT THE SHIPS; AND THE ACTS OF AJAX.

BOOK XVI.-THE SIXTH BATTLE, THE ACTS AND DEATH OF PATROCLUS

BOOK XVII.-THE SEVENTH BATTLE, FOR THE BODY OF PATROCLUS.--THE ACTS OF MENELAUS.

BOOK XVIII.-THE GRIEF OF ACHILLES, AND NEWARMOUR MADE HIM BY VULCAN.

BOOK XIX.-THE RECONCILIATION OF ACHILLES AND AGAMEMNON.

BOOK XX.-THE BATTLE OF THE GODS, AND THE ACTS OF ACHILLES.

BOOK XXI.-THE BATTLE IN THE RIVER SCAMANDER.

BOOK XXII.-THE DEATH OF HECTOR.

BOOK XXIII.-FUNERAL GAMES IN HONOUR OF PATROCLUS.

BOOK XXIV.-THE REDEMPTION OF THE BODY OFHECTOR.

CONCLUDING NOTE.

Footnotes

Great Expectations (Wisehouse Classics - with the original Illustrations by John McLenan 1860)

GREAT EXPECTATIONS is Charles Dickens' thirteenth novel and his penultimate completed novel; a bildungsroman which depicts the personal growth and personal development of an orphan nicknamed Pip. It is Dickens's second novel, after David Copperfield, to be fully narrated in the first person. The novel was first published as a serial in Dickens's weekly periodical All the Year Round, from 1 December 1860 to August 1861. In October 1861, Chapman and Hall published the novel in three volumes.

It is set among marshes in Kent, and in London, in the early to mid-1800s, and contains some of Dickens' most memorable scenes, including the opening, in a graveyard, where the young Pip is accosted by the escaped convict, Abel Magwitch. GREAT EXPECTATIONS is full of extreme imagery -poverty; prison ships and chains, and fights to the death-and has a colorful cast of characters who have entered popular culture. Dickens's themes include wealth and poverty, love and rejection, and the eventual triumph of good over evil. GREAT EXPECTATIONS is popular both with readers and literary critics, and has been translated into many languages, and adapted numerous times into various media.

Upon its release, the novel received near universal acclaim. Thomas Carlyle spoke disparagingly of "all that Pip's nonsense". Later, George Bernard Shaw praised the novel, as "All of one piece and consistently truthful." During the serial publication, Dickens was pleased with public response to GREAT EXPECTATIONS and its sales; when the plot first formed in his mind, he called it "a very fine, new and grotesque idea." (more on www.wisehouse-classics.com)

Jane Eyre (Golden Deer Classics) [The Classics Collection #02]

Charlotte Bronte's most beloved novel describes the passionate love between the courageous orphan Jane Eyre and the brilliant, brooding, and domineering Rochester.

The loneliness and cruelty of Jane's childhood strengthens her natural independence and spirit, which prove invaluable when she takes a position as a governess at Thornfield Hall. But after she falls in love with her sardonic employer, her discovery of his terrible secret forces her to make a heart-wrenching choice. Ever since its publication in 1847, "Jane Eyre" has enthralled every kind of reader, from the most critical and cultivated to the youngest and most unabashedly romantic. It lives as one of the great triumphs of storytelling and as a moving and unforgettable portrayal of a woman's quest for self-respect.

FRANKENSTEIN or The Modern Prometheus (Uncensored 1818 Edition - Wisehouse Classics)

This is the Uncensored 1818 Edition FRANKENSTEIN; OR, THE MODERN PROMETHEUS, a novel written by the English author Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley about the young science student Victor Frankenstein, who creates a grotesque but sentient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was eighteen, and the novel was published when she was twenty. The first edition was published anonymously in London in 1818. Shelley's name appears on the second edition, published in France in 1823. Shelley had travelled through Europe in 1814, journeying along the river Rhine in Germany with a stop in Gernsheim which is just 17 km away from Frankenstein Castle, where, two centuries before, an alchemist was engaged in experiments. Later, she travelled in the region of Geneva (Switzerland)-where much of the story takes place-and the topic of galvanism and other similar occult ideas were themes of conversation among her companions, particularly her lover and future husband, Percy Shelley. Mary, Percy, Lord Byron, and John Polidori decided to have a competition to see who could write the best horror story. After thinking for days, Shelley dreamt about a scientist who created life and was horrified by what he had made; her dream later evolved into the novel's story.

Shelley completed her writing in May 1817, and Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus was first published on 11 March 1818 by the small London publishing house of Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor, & Jones. The second edition of Frankenstein was published on 11 August 1822 in two volumes (by G. and W. B. Whittaker) following the success of the stage play Presumption; or, the Fate of Frankenstein by Richard Brinsley Peake; this edition credited Mary Shelley as the author.

On 31 October 1831, the first "popular" edition in one volume appeared, published by Henry Colburn & Richard Bentley. This edition was heavily revised by Mary Shelley, partially because of pressure to make the story more conservative, and included a new, longer preface by her, presenting a somewhat embellished version of the genesis of the story. This edition tends to be the one most widely read now, although editions containing the original 1818 text are still published. Many scholars prefer the 1818 text, arguing that it preserves the spirit of Shelley's original publication.

A Christmas Carol (Wisehouse Classics - with original illustrations)

A CHRISTMAS CAROL is a novella by Charles Dickens, first published in London on December 1843. The novella met with instant success and critical acclaim. A Christmas Carol tells the story of a bitter old miser named Ebenezer Scrooge and his transformation into a gentler, kindlier man after visitations by the ghost of his former business partner Jacob Marley and the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come. The book was written at a time when the British were examining and exploring Christmas traditions from the past as well as new customs such as Christmas cards and Christmas trees. Carol singing took a new lease on life during this time. Dickens' sources for the tale appear to be many and varied, but are, principally, the humiliating experiences of his childhood, his sympathy for the poor, and various Christmas stories and fairy tales.

Dickens was not the first author to celebrate the Christmas season in literature, but it was he who superimposed his humanitarian vision of the holiday upon the public, an idea that has been termed as Dickens' "Carol Philosophy". Dickens believed the best way to reach the broadest segment of the population regarding his concerns about poverty and social injustice was to write a deeply felt Christmas story rather than polemical pamphlets and essays. Dickens' career as a best-selling author was on the wane, and the writer felt he needed to produce a tale that would prove both profitable and popular. Dickens' visit to the work-worn industrial city of Manchester was the "spark" that fired the author to produce a story about the poor, a repentant miser, and redemption that would become A Christmas Carol. The forces that inspired Dickens to create a powerful, impressive and enduring tale were the profoundly humiliating experiences of his childhood, the plight of the poor and their children during the boom decades of the 1830s and 1840s, and Washington Irving's essays on old English Christmas traditions published in his Sketch Book (1820); and fairy tales and nursery stories, as well as satirical essays and religious tracts.

Dracula

Bram Stoker's vampire novel Dracula, which paved the way for vampire lore in popular culture, was published today in 1897. Here are 10 facts about the former Daily Telegraph journalist.

Bram Stoker wrote 12 novels, including Dracula and The Jewel of Seven Stars, and also published collections of short stories. Dracula was originally titled The Undead. As Dracula says: "My revenge is just begun! I spread it over centuries, and time is on my side." To date, more than 1000 novels and 200 films have been made about the vampire Dracula.

Stoker, who had been an occasional freelance contributor to The Daily Telegraph in the 1890s, began working regularly for the paper as part of the literary staff from 1905 until 1910, during which time he also wrote theatre reviews for the paper. During this period, he was also working on The Lair of the White Worm.

Born in Dublin on 8 November 1847, Stoker had an ancient, colourful lineage on his mother's side - including the legendary sheriff of Galway, who hanged his own son. It was material the writer mined in his fiction.

A key inspiration for Dracula was always said to have been Vlad the Impaler, the 15th-century Transylvanian-born prince also known as Vlad III Dracula of Wallachia. However, historian Fiona Fitzsimons says: "Stoker did not use overtly Irish references in Dracula, but his main theme is taken from Irish history - the history, we now learn, of his own family - recast in the writer's imagination. Manus the Magnificent (Manus O'Donnell,who once ruled much of Ireland) was Stoker's direct ancestor and was an influence on the book."

Around the World in 80 Days (Unabridged Classics) (Sterling Unabridged Classics)

For as long as anyone can remember, Phileas Fogg's daily ritual has never varied by even a minute. Then, on a whim and a bet, he sets out to prove that he can span the globe and return to his club in London in only 80 days. Suddenly, his life is turned upside down and every day offers an exciting new adventure.

Persuasion (Wisehouse Classics - With Illustrations by H.M. Brock)

PERSUASION is Jane Austen's last completed novel, published posthumously. She began it soon after she had finished Emma and completed it in August 1816. Persuasion was published in December 1817, but is dated 1818. The author died earlier in 1817. As the Napoleonic Wars come to an end in 1814, Admirals and Captains of the Royal Navy are put ashore, their work done. Anne Elliot meets Captain Frederick Wentworth after seven years, by the chance of his sister and brother-in-law renting her father's estate, while she stays for a few months with her married sister, living nearby. They fell in love the first time, but she broke off the engagement.



Besides the theme of persuasion, the novel evokes other topics, with which Austen was familiar: The Royal Navy, in which two of Jane Austen's brothers rose to the rank of admiral; and the superficial social life of Bath. It is portrayed extensively and serves as a setting for the second half of Persuasion. In many respects, Persuasion marks a break with Austen's previous works, both in the more biting, even irritable satire directed at some of the novel's characters and in the regretful, resigned outlook of its otherwise admirable heroine, Anne Elliot, in the first part of the story. Against this is set the energy and appeal of the Royal Navy, which symbolizes for Anne and the reader the possibility of a more outgoing, engaged, and fulfilling life, and it is this worldview which triumphs for the most part at the end of the novel.

Sense and Sensibility (Wisehouse Classics - With Illustrations by H.M. Brock)

SENSE AND SENSIBILITY is a novel by Jane Austen, and was her first published work when it appeared in 1811 under the pseudonym "A Lady". A work of romantic fiction, better known as a comedy of manners, Sense and Sensibility is set in southwest England, London and Kent between 1792 and 1797, and portrays the life and loves of the Dashwood sisters, Elinor and Marianne. The novel follows the young ladies to their new home, a meagre cottage on a distant relative's property, where they experience love, romance and heartbreak. Austen biographer Claire Tomalin argues that Sense and Sensibility has a "wobble in its approach", which developed because Austen, in the course of writing the novel, gradually became less certain about whether sense or sensibility should triumph. Austen characterizes Marianne as a sweet lady with attractive qualities: intelligence, musical talent, frankness, and the capacity to love deeply. She also acknowledges that Willoughby, with all his faults, continues to love and, in some measure, appreciate Marianne. For these reasons, some readers find Marianne's ultimate marriage to Colonel Brandon an unsatisfactory ending. Other interpretations, however, have argued that Austen's intention was not to debate the superior value of either sense or sensibility in good judgment, but rather to demonstrate that both are equally important but must be applied with good balance to one another

The Picture of Dorian Gray (Chump Change Edition)

DIFFERENT OFFER (this item listed here is DIFFERENT from the title and/or picture above. Please see description & pictures by BookGems before placing an order): Edition Penguin Classics (an imprint of Penguin Books), 2009. Edited with an Introduction and Notes by Robert Mighall. ISBN: 978-0-141-44246-4. HARDBACK. 296 pages, size: 13.6 x 20.5 2.5 cm. The new and unread book remains in excellent condition: cloth bound hardcover bright with shiny decoration on cover and lettering on spine; text all clean, neat and tight. Prompt dispatch from UK.

The Secret Garden (Classic Starts)

HardCover. Pub Date: March. 2005 Pages: 160 Publisher: Sterling Publishing Following Sterling 's spectacularly successful Launch of its Children's classic novels (240.000 books in print to date). Comes a dazzling new series: Classic Starts. The stories are aidged; the quality is complete. Classic Starts treats the world's beloved tales (and children) with the respect they deserve - all at an incomparable price.The discovery of a neglected garden transforms the life of a sullen and unloved little girl-and everyone around her. too. When the newly orphaned Mary Lennox leaves her native India and arrives at her uncle's mansion in Yorkshire. everything seems strange to her. Then Mary hears of a mysterious garden where no one has set foot in 10 years. With the help of some new friends. she plans to uncover its secrets ... and make it blossom once again. Ten-year-old Mary comes to ...

The Wind in the Willows: By the River Bank (Wind in the Willows Library)

One of four of Kenneth Grahames classic stories delightfully retold for younger readers. For ages 5 and up.

Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice is a novel of manners by Jane Austen, first published in 1813. The story follows the main character, Elizabeth Bennet, as she deals with issues of manners, upbringing, morality, education, and marriage in the society of the landed gentry of the British Regency. Elizabeth is the second of five daughters of a country gentleman living near the fictional town of Meryton in Hertfordshire, near London. Page 2 of a letter from Jane Austen to her sister Cassandra (11 June 1799) in which she first mentions Pride and Prejudice, using its working title First Impressions. Set in England in the early 19th century, Pride and Prejudice tells the story of Mr and Mrs Bennet's five unmarried daughters after the rich and eligible Mr Bingley and his status-conscious friend, Mr Darcy, have moved into their neighbourhood. While Bingley takes an immediate liking to the eldest Bennet daughter, Jane, Darcy has difficulty adapting to local society and repeatedly clashes with the second-eldest Bennet daughter, Elizabeth. Though Austen set the story at the turn of the 19th century, it retains a fascination for modern readers, continuing near the top of lists of "most loved books." It has become one of the most popular novels in English literature, selling over 20 million copies, and receives considerable attention from literary scholars. Modern interest in the book has resulted in a number of dramatic adaptations and an abundance of novels and stories imitating Austen's memorable characters or themes.

The Iliad

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The Odyssey

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The Great Gatsby

In 1922, F Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write "something new--something extraordinary and beautiful and simple, intricately patterned". That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned and, above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald's finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author's generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald's--and his country's--most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed and the promise of new beginnings. "Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter--tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther... And one fine morning--" Gatsby's rise to glory and eventual fall from grace be comes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream. It's also a love story, of sorts, the narrative of Gatsby's quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan. The pair meet five years before the novel begins, when Daisy is a legendary young Louisville beauty and Gatsby an impoverished officer. They fall in love, but while Gatsby serves overseas, Daisy marries the brutal, bullying but extremely rich Tom Buchanan. After the war, Gatsby devotes himself blindly to the pursuit of wealth by whatever means--and to the pursuit of Daisy, which amounts to the same thing. "Her voice is full of money," Gatsby says admiringly, in one of the novel's more famous descriptions. His millions made, Gatsby buys a mansion across Long Island Sound from Daisy's patrician East Egg address, throws lavish parties and waits for her to appear. When s he does, events unfold with all the tragic inevitability of a Greek drama, with detached, cynical neighbour Nick Carraway acting as chorus throughout. Spare, elegantly plotted and written in crystalline prose, The Great Gatsby is as perfectly satisfying as the best kind of poem. Perry Freeman, Amazon.com

Mansfield Park (French Edition)

Extrait : J'etais tellement etonnee de voir l'affaire d'Etat que c'etait ! Desirer un cheval et une charrette a la campagne semblait une chose extraordinaire ! Aussi, je demandais a ma femme de chambre de s'en occuper directement, et comme je ne pouvais sortir de mon vestiaire sans voir une ferme, ni marcher dans la plantation sans passer devant une autre, je pensais qu'il suffirait de les demander pour les avoir et je n'avais que l'embarras du choix. Vous devinez ma surprise, quand je decouvris que j'avais demande la chose la moins raisonnable, la plus impossible, et que j'avais offense tous les fermiers, tous les laboureurs par ma demande. Quant au secretaire du Dr. Grant, je croyais plus prudent de ne pas etre sur son chemin, et mon beau-frere lui-meme, qui en general est la bonte meme, me regardait d'un air sombre depuis qu'il avait appris ce que j'avais ose demander.

Crime And Punishment (Everyman's Library Classics)

DIFFERENT OFFER (this item listed here is DIFFERENT from the title and/or picture above. Please see description & pictures by BookGems before placing an order): Edition Oxford Classics published by Oxford University Press, 1980. Translation by Jessie Coulson, with an Introduction by John Jones. Complete in ONE volume. ISBN: 0-19-251028-2. HARDBACK. 530 pages. Just light tan to paper edges. Other than that, the new and unread book remains in excellent condition throughout: dark blue faux leatherette hard cover with gilt decoration on front cover and lettering on spine remains intact, text all clean, neat and tight. Prompt dispatch from UK.

Wizard of Oz

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the publication of L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz, master paper engineer Robert Sabuda has created a pop-up version of Dorothy's adventures in Oz that fans will find hard to resist. Modeling his depictions of Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the rest after W. W. Denslow's original art, Sabuda adds a third dimension that would have rocked Denslow's--and Baum's--world. A rapidly spinning cyclone actually casts a breeze over the startled reader's face. Glorious red poppies wave seductively in a field. And the Emerald City positively glitters with green, especially when young readers try on the special tinted "Spectacles for You" provided in a pocket on the page. The abridged text, provided in minibooklets set onto each page, covers enough basics for the Oz novice, but we recommend a read-aloud of the original, as well, for all the glory and detail of Baum's fantastic tale. Sabuda's homage to the classic is truly spectacular; even purists will gasp in delight at the sight of the humbug wizard floating away in his shiny green, gold, and blue hot-air balloon. This great introduction to the story of Oz doubles as a fun collector's item. (Ages 3 to 7) --Emilie Coulter

The Age Of Innocence (Everyman's Library Classics)

Edith Wharton's novel reworks the eternal triangle of two women and a man in a strikingly original manner. When about to marry the beautiful and conventional May Welland, Newland Archer falls in love with her very unconventional cousin, the Countess Olenska. The consequent drama, set in New York during the 1870s, reveals terrifying chasms under the polished surface of upper-class society as the increasingly fraught Archer struggles with conflicting obligations and desires. The first woman to do so, Edith Wharton won the Pulitzer Prize for this dark comedy of manners which was immediately recognized as one of her greatest achievements.

David Copperfield (Dover Giant Thrift Editions)

"Like many fond parents, I have in my heart of hearts a favourite child," confessed Charles Dickens in the preface of this novel, "and his name is David Copperfield." Millions of readers have taken young David into their hearts as well, weeping over his misfortunes and exulting in his triumphs. Dickens' seventh novel, "David Copperfield," appeared in 1850, by which time he was a British national institution. Based on the author's own tumultuous journey from boy to man, this epic traces David's progress from his mother's sheltering arms to the miseries of boarding-school and sweatshop, and the rewards of friendship, romance, and self-discovery in his vocation as a writer.In addition to its compelling narrative, the great appeal of" David Copperfield" lies in its memorable cast of characters. From Mr. Murdstone, the brutal stepfather, to the scheming clerk Uriah Heep, the novel is peopled by vividly observed characters. Nursemaid Peggoty, bursting with vitality, leaves a trail of flying buttons in her wake. Grandiloquent Mr. Micawber is ever-confident that something will turn up to save his large brood from penury. Kind by wildly eccentric, Aunt Betsey Trotwood accepts counsel from the wise fool, Mr. Dick, and provides a heated reception for trespassing donkeys. Dickens' genius was comic, and "David Copperfield" reflects his view of existence as a mixture of laughter and tears -- with laughter uppermost.

Seek and Find Classics: Pride and Prejudice

DIFFERENT OFFER (this item listed here is DIFFERENT from the title and/or picture above. Please see description & pictures by BookGems before placing an order): Edition Penguin Classics (an imprint of Penguin Books), 2008. Reissued Edition with complete text edited with an Introduction by Vivien Jones. New Chronology, updated Further Readings with an original 1972 Penguin Classics Introduction by Tony Tanner. ISBN: 978-0-141-04034-9. HARDBACK. 477 pages, size: 13.5 x 20.4 x 4 cm. Just light tan to paper edges. Other than that, the unread book remains in excellent condition: cloth bound hard cover bright with gilt lettering on spine and on front; text all clean, neat and tight. Prompt dispatch from UK.

The Moonstone