Fiction Biographical Fiction Books

The Crown in the Heather: The Bruce Trilogy: Book I: Volume 1

In 1290, Scotland is without a king. Two families-the Bruces and the Balliols-vie for the throne. Ro....

Great Expectations (Wisehouse Classics - with the original Illustrations by John McLenan 1860)

GREAT EXPECTATIONS is Charles Dickens' thirteenth novel and his penultimate completed novel; a bildungsroman which depicts the personal growth and personal development of an orphan nicknamed Pip. It is Dickens's second novel, after David Copperfield, to be fully narrated in the first person. The novel was first published as a serial in Dickens's weekly periodical All the Year Round, from 1 December 1860 to August 1861. In October 1861, Chapman and Hall published the novel in three volumes.

It is set among marshes in Kent, and in London, in the early to mid-1800s, and contains some of Dickens' most memorable scenes, including the opening, in a graveyard, where the young Pip is accosted by the escaped convict, Abel Magwitch. GREAT EXPECTATIONS is full of extreme imagery -poverty; prison ships and chains, and fights to the death-and has a colorful cast of characters who have entered popular culture. Dickens's themes include wealth and poverty, love and rejection, and the eventual triumph of good over evil. GREAT EXPECTATIONS is popular both with readers and literary critics, and has been translated into many languages, and adapted numerous times into various media.

Upon its release, the novel received near universal acclaim. Thomas Carlyle spoke disparagingly of "all that Pip's nonsense". Later, George Bernard Shaw praised the novel, as "All of one piece and consistently truthful." During the serial publication, Dickens was pleased with public response to GREAT EXPECTATIONS and its sales; when the plot first formed in his mind, he called it "a very fine, new and grotesque idea." (more on www.wisehouse-classics.com)

Persuasion

With A to Z Classics, discover or rediscover all the classics of literature.

Contains Active Table of Contents (HTML)

Persuasion is the last novel fully completed by Jane Austen. It was published at the end of 1817, six months after her death.The story concerns Anne Elliot, a young Englishwoman of 27 years, whose family is moving to lower their expenses and get out of debt, at the same time as the wars come to an end, putting sailors on shore. They rent their home to an Admiral and his wife. The wife's brother, Navy Captain Frederick Wentworth, had been engaged to Anne in 1806, and now they meet again, both single and unattached, after no contact in more than seven years. This sets the scene for many humorous encounters as well as a second, well-considered chance at love and marriage for Anne Elliot in her second "bloom".

The novel was well-received in the early 19th century. Greater fame came later in the century, continued in the 20th century, and through to the 21st century. Much scholarly debate on Austen's work has since been published. Anne Elliot is noteworthy among Jane Austen's heroines for her relative maturity. As Persuasion is Austen's last completed novel, it is accepted as her most maturely written novel showing a refinement of literary conception indicative of a woman approaching forty years of age. Unlike Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice, the novel Persuasion was not rewritten from earlier drafts of novels which Austen had originally started before 1800. Her use of free indirect discourse in narrative was by 1816 fully developed and in full evidence. The first edition of Persuasion was co-published with the previously unpublished Northanger Abbey, written in 1803; later editions of both were published separately.

Popular acceptance of the novel was reflected, by two notable made-for-television filmed adaptations released first in Britain: Amanda Root starred in the lead role in the 1995 version co-starring Ciaran Hinds, and was followed by Sally Hawkins in the 2007 version made for ITV1 co-starring Rupert Penry-Jones.

Psychological Terror: The Child Within (Quick Reads Book 13)



"Every day in every way exercise the Child within you."

Sounds sort of harmless and might even be fun. There again before taking any wild beast out of its cage for a bit of exercise careful consideration needs to be given as to what type it is.

It might bite the hand that feeds it.

Read for 'FREE' with Kindle Unlimited*

When more is less and less is more, this Quick Reads of one thousand words

says more than enough on this particular Child Within.

Enjoy

*Subject to terms and conditions.

The Princess Of Egypt Must Die

Before she became one of Egypt's greatest queens, she was a lonely princess who ached to belong...

Princess Arsinoe came of age in the glittering court of Ptolemaic Egypt. Abused by her ruthless sister, a pawn in the dynastic ambitions of her father, and dismissed by the king who claimed her for a bride, young Arsinoe finds herself falling in love with a young man forbidden to her. She dreams of a great destiny, but if she is ever to rule Egypt, she must first survive the nest of vipers otherwise known as her family.

(This novelette by the acclaimed author of LILY OF THE NILE and SONG OF THE NILE originally appeared in the ETERNAL SPRING anthology of Young Adult Fiction. It is approximately 11k words long.)

Good Morning Rome

A short story by the Italian author Michele Ponte, Good Morning Rome will surprise you.

They come to Rome by plane, boat, train, coach. They hitchhike or they come on foot. They come looking for success, hope, or God. They come for art, for Roman antiquity, for museums, exhibitions, History. They come to Rome because it's the Eternal City.

They come looking for work. They come so they can study and then find work. They come. 'And it's a good thing they do come,' says the Ancient Roman soldier standing outside the Coliseum. 'Please! Just think about it, will you? If these people didn't come, how would anyone ever find the dough to keep this city afloat?'

This is one guy who really does get it, one of the few guys of his age who gets it. Without all these people coming and churning the money around, we'd have nothing. Not a damn thing. Crumbling walls is all.

They come to Rome to get close to power.

They come to Rome to feel they're artists.

They come to gamble or to deal drugs. But the main thing - you may as well admit it - is that they come. All of them.

I love myself ok?: A Berlin Trilogy

Young, angry and articulate, the narrator of Chloe Zeegen's Berlin Trilogy moves to Berlin (drugs, clubs, parks and politics), outs herself on Facebook and tests her luck. Fast-paced and in your face.

Chloe Zeegen's trilogy of short stories requires a genre all of its own. Social commentary? The Facebook generation's sexual awakening? Zeegen's spontaneous and conversational style reads like online chat intersected by passages of poetry. Her narrator experiences Berlin's parties and private views, meets random people, assembles her Ikea bed, paces through history and turns an intellectual eye to pop architecture. Kreuzberg and Neukolln feature, as does the 'Spati' - the trusty Berlin 7-11. An original and striking voice that you have certainly not heard the last of at mikrotext.

Tuning the World: The Johann-Sebastian Bach-Novel (Excerpt)

The free excerpt of the first German novel about Johann Sebastian Bach contains the Content, and 4 of 48 chapters of the novel.

The Garden on Sunset: A Novel of Golden-Era Hollywood (Hollywood's Garden of Allah novels Book 1)

HOLLYWOOD...as seen through the eyes of its most infamous garden.When Marcus Adler's father runs him out of Pennsylvania, he can think of only one place to go: 8152 Sunset Boulevard, the home of luminous silent screen star Alla Nazimova, who visited him on his sickbed when he was a child. But when Marcus gets to Hollywood, Madame Nazimova's home has been converted to a hotel. Marcus checks into The Garden of Allah and starts his new life. He soon finds friends in Kathryn Massey, who ran away from her overbearing stage mother to become a journalist, and Gwendolyn Brick, a hopeful actress from the Other Hollywood-Hollywood, Florida-who wants to try her luck in Glitter City. The three naive hopefuls band together to tread water against a tidal wave of threadbare casting couches, nervous bootleggers, human billboards, round-the-world zeppelins, sinking gambling boats, waiters in blackface, William Randolph Hearst, the Long Beach earthquake, starlets, harlots, Harlows and Garbos. But how will they get their feet inside Hollywood's golden door?THE GARDEN ON SUNSET is the first in a series of novels following Marcus, Kathryn and Gwendolyn as they leap and lurch, win and lose their way through Hollywood's golden years. If you love Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City books, you'll want to get lost in The Garden of Allah.

Push Not the River (The Poland Trilogy Book 1)

A panoramic and epic novel, Push Not the River recounts the rich story of Poland in the....

Just Food for Thought

Just Food for Thought is a story about Patty's life during ages 18 to 25. She leaves Texas to go off to college in the Pacific Northwest, leaving behind her family and friends. Her idyllic ways of thinking are soon challenged. She experiences life on her own. She becomes ingrained into college life, where she makes many friends. However, she never forgets her strong family roots while finding her way in the world. She crosses paths with a handsome upper classman, then enters into a darker realm. But she also crosses paths with good people who help her through rough times. She marries, has a baby, eats health foods, sews clothes, writes poetry. She sees a ghost, has dreams of the future, and dreams with messages. She weathers storms. She learns that friends die, babies cry, and mother's love lasts. She learns about the special bond of love with her dogs, even years after her first Labrador dies and her second one appears. She sees how unconscious connections with people spiral from past to future. She learns that her own life moves in spirals - goes full circle - then meets on a different plane. Patty's memoir, begun twenty five years after the events, was based on vague recollections. Eight years later, the memoirs became intertwined with her letters. The letters were presented to her by her mother in 2013 - lovingly tied into bundles with baby blue satin ribbons. Vague recollections of her life, as it turns out, do not always match letters written at the time. Both accounts remain within the story, which has led to some duplication, as well as some contradiction. That's just food for thought, dear reader.

A Day With John Cheever

James Wolcott writing in Vanity Fair said, "If a tinge of melancholy haunts the cocktail hour, if a croquet mallet left derelict on the lawn evokes a broken merriment, if the bar car of a commuter train gives off a stale whiff of failed promise and bitter alimony, pause and pay homage to John Cheever. Light a bug candle on the patio in his honor. For Cheever--novelist, master of the short story, prolific diarist--is the patron saint of Eastern Seaboard pathos and redemption, the Edward Hopper of suburban ennui, preserving minor epiphanies in amber."

Cheever's short story, Reunion, gripped Jeff Swystun from the start. It is absolutely succinct at 824 words but has the heft of a full-length novel. That tale and others of Cheever's are referenced in this inventive short story that pays tribute to Cheever. It imagines a day with the writer in Manhattan and draws not only on his work but also his personal essays and the amazing biography penned by Blake Bailey. It explores the dark and light of being and being remembered.

So take a walk...and a drink...with John Cheever.

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