Biography Gay & Lesbian Books

Kids Dont Tell - 1969 Max Goes to Fishing Camp: Terrorized-How I Avoided Being Molested-Why I Regret Not Telling

A memory of what happened to me at a relatives fishing camp was triggered by of all things a picture of my nephew holding a trout he caught.

Shattering Masks: Affirming my identity. Transitioning my faith.

Who am I? It's a simple question. Yet most of my life the answer was incredibly elusive. So many elements of our experience blend together to ultimately create our core identity. As these pieces of me emerged, I found myself hiding them behind masks; masks intended to make me look exactly like everyone around me wanted me to look. It wasn't until the strain of hiding pushed me to the edge that I began to peak at myself from behind the masks, to realize I am not responsible for the thoughts and opinions others hold of me. It was then the masks began to shatter.

"Shattering Masks" is the story of how I came to reconcile my faith in God with living a genuine, authentic life.

Erika and Klaus Mann in New York: Escape from the Magic Mountain (Chicago Shorts)

This is the riveting tale of two brave nonconformists whose dramatic lives open up new perspectives on the history of the twentieth century. Thomas Mann's two eldest children, Erika and Klaus, were unconventional, rebellious, and fiercely devoted to each other. Empowered by their close bond, they espoused vehemently anti-Nazi views in a Europe swept up in fascism and were openly, even defiantly, gay in an age of secrecy and repression. In 1936, they fled to the United States and chose New York as their new adopted home. From the start, the two were embroiled by the literary and intellectual life, political turmoil, and shifting sexual mores of their times. Andrea Weiss engages their struggles, their friendships (Maurice Wertheim and Annemarie Schwarzenbach, among them), and their liaisons, as the siblings try to adapt to their new lives, all while introducing their work to an American audience for the first time.

I love myself ok?: A Berlin Trilogy

Young, angry and articulate, the narrator of Chloe Zeegen's Berlin Trilogy moves to Berlin (drugs, clubs, parks and politics), outs herself on Facebook and tests her luck. Fast-paced and in your face.

Chloe Zeegen's trilogy of short stories requires a genre all of its own. Social commentary? The Facebook generation's sexual awakening? Zeegen's spontaneous and conversational style reads like online chat intersected by passages of poetry. Her narrator experiences Berlin's parties and private views, meets random people, assembles her Ikea bed, paces through history and turns an intellectual eye to pop architecture. Kreuzberg and Neukolln feature, as does the 'Spati' - the trusty Berlin 7-11. An original and striking voice that you have certainly not heard the last of at mikrotext.